This is madness

No March is complete without a very important tournament. This allows intense rivals to fight it out among each other to see who comes out victorious near the end of the month, all the while it is being followed by highly enthusiastic supporters of the teams involved. The victors are certainly entitled to bragging rights and elevated respect until the following March. This is all of course a reference to the event known as “March Stock Mania.” The corporation with the bragging rights this year is Google.

CNN Money has said that this is the latest in Google’s accolades for this year after their 52-week low last June (since which their shares have soared up 45% to get higher than $840 in March). The way that this type of tournament is won, is with the votes of “readers,’” indicating investor confidence. At the end of it this year, Google beat Exxon Mobil with 56% of the vote, getting revenge for when Exxon knocked them out in the Final Four of last year, according to CNN Money.

The companies that Google had to defeat to get to the finals were: “Hasbro, Caterpillar, Microsoft, and the former defending champion Apple (first time this was not in the finals).” Given the intense Apple vs. Google rivalry, it should come as no surprise that of all these, Apple was the toughest to defeat (according to CNN Money Google got by with 53% of the vote). Actually, Apple’s stock has fallen from an all-time high by almost as much as Google’s has risen from a 52 week low (they are now at a fourteen month low), and Google’s Android has a significantly larger smartphone market share than Apple’s iPhone, as reported by CNN Money.

With all this said, there is one piece of good news for these companies. Hedge funds still hold financial stocks in high regard, but these were all defeated in the first round. That means that it is increasingly possible that these (hedge funds) will be a new piece of the market these companies can target. There is also a saying that “the only constant is change.” This is the perfect way to describe the stock market’s natural variability, which ultimately means we cannot use any one day to predict what will happen the next day, as is true for almost everything about life.

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